Three adults sitting around coffee table with their laptops talking and laughing.

The CIDDL Community: We Need You

CIDDL is the Center for Innovation, Design, and Digital Learning and our mission is to improve faculty’s capacity to use educational technology in personnel preparation programs. Part of our role is to teach about new and emerging technologies as they relate to students with disabilities, teachers and related service providers, higher education faculty, and other leaders in education. We do this through blog posts (like this one), webinars, research and practice briefs, and CIZZLEs.
Student using cell phone.

Mobile Technologies to Support Student Learning

Teachers, principals, and school districts have been battling cell phones and other mobile technologies (remember pagers?) in the classroom for nearly two decades. Reasons cited as to why these devices should be banned from the classroom include cheating, bullying, and illegal/ illicit activities. But, in the digital age, where students entering the workforce are expected to have an understanding of not only basic technology, but how to leverage it to maximize productivity and creativity, shouldn’t those in education be looking for ways to leverage mobile devices to support student learning? In this blog post, we will explore the ways in which recent literature proposes mobile devices can be used in K-12 classrooms and make suggestions as to how these can transfer to higher education.
Hands holding money that is fanned out.

The Question of Equity in the Age of ChatGPT

CIDDL has been discussing all things related to ChatGPT and AI lately. In a previous blog, we explored equity, diversity, and access issues related to integrating this technology into the classroom. Challenges raised included access to devices, non-bias AI, AI that empowers all students rather than perpetuate stereotypes and should reduce disparities between students. With recent updates to ChatGPT and the added premium features, the issues related to AI and equity are becoming very apparent.
Multiple children using technology while sitting against a wall.

Playing Around with Technology: Part II 

In a previous post, we discussed the importance of play for children with disabilities and how technology can facilitate play. Teachers employed technology in the classroom to encourage social interactions between students with and without disabilities. Students, when given opportunities, took existing technology and used it in innovative ways. Finally, parents spoke about how technology provided alternative forms of communication or even allowed them to watch how their children played.
A bowl of gumbo.

Chef Tara Mason: Gumbo and UDL & AT as an Approach to Assessing Learning Needs

Tara Mason is an assistant professor of inclusive education at Western Colorado University. She uses a strengths-based student learning framework to investigate Universal Design for Learning (UDL), technology, and accessibility. She kicked off CIDDL Cizzles Season 3 with her family gumbo recipe! She discussed proactive teaching, UDL, and progress monitoring in this week’s Cizzle.